Infographics from the Michigan Senate Republicans


Amelia Earhart Day

Each year on July 24, it is National Amelia Earhart Day. This day honors the famous aviation pioneer, Amelia Earhart and celebrates her birth. Author and American aviation pioneer, Amelia Mary Earhart was born on July 24, 1897. Earhart was the first female pilot (aviatrix) to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. For this flight record, she received the Unites States Distinguished Flying Cross.


Ty Cobb

On this day in 1927, Ty Cobb collected his 4,000th hit.

Other Ty Cobb Facts:

Ty Cobb has the highest lifetime batting average (.367) of all time.

• Ty Cobb played on three World Series teams, all with the Detroit Tigers.

• Ty Cobb is second on the all-time hit list behind Pete Rose.

• Ty Cobb is one of only two people to hit a home run before his 20th birthday and after his 40th birthday.

• Ty Cobb stole home more than anyone else (54).

• Ty Cobb won more batting average titles than any other person (12).

• In 1936, he became the first player ever selected to the Hall of Fame.

• Ty Cobb became the first ball player to star in a movie, a drama by Grantland Rice, "Somewhere in Georgia."

• Cobb endorsed a chewing gum, a brand of suspenders and underwear.

• He associated with financiers and industrialists, golfed with President William Howard Taft, and visited President Woodrow Wilson in the White House.

• Cobb invested his money into real estate and securities, and owned an auto dealership. His best investment was in a Atlanta-based soft drink company, Coca-Cola.

• Ty Cobb's dentures sold for $7,475 at auction.


Youth Dairy Days at MSU

The education of Michigan’s future dairy farmers is extremely important to Michigan’s continued success in the dairy market. The Michigan Youth Dairy Days at the MSU pavilion encourages and promotes youth involvement in the dairy industry while providing education opportunities in dairy activities.


Gerald Ford's Birthday

Gerald Rudolph Ford Jr. (born Leslie Lynch King Jr.; July 14, 1913 – December 26, 2006) served as the 38th President of the United States from 1974 to 1977. Prior to this he was the 40th Vice President of the United States, serving from 1973 until President Richard Nixon's resignation in 1974. Ford was also the first person appointed to the vice presidency under the terms of the 25th Amendment and, as such, he claimed the distinction as the first and to date the only person to have served as both Vice President and President of the United States without being elected to either office.


Blueberry Month

Blueberry production and processing has flourished in the global market over the past ten years, almost doubling in the US during that period alone. Michigan has continually ranked in the top 5 states for blueberry production.

  • As of 2016, Michigan ranks #3 nationally in blueberry production at 92 million pounds of blueberries produced (in 2016)
  • Most of Michigan’s blueberry production takes place in Southwest Michigan.
  • There are over 20 blueberry varieties that are commercially grown on a large scale in Michigan.
  • Harvest season is June through October

 


Michigan Craft Beer Month

July is Michigan Craft Beer Month! Michigan’s beer industry is flourishing. About 10 percent of Michigan’s beer sales is craft beer, and we have more than 200 brewers, and we are 5th in the nation for breweries, microbreweries and brew pubs.

  • Michigan’s beer industry is worth $10.5 billion to the state (according to a report that looked at employment and wages in 2016)
    • This is up from $6.64 billion two years ago (2014)
  • Roughly 34,390 jobs in Michigan are directly related to beer (brewing, wholesale or retail)
    • These employees earn a combined $941,748,800
  • 846,029 barrels of craft beer are produced each year


Parks and Recreation Month

Join the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) - a non-profit dedicated to the advancement of public parks, recreation and conservation – as they celebrate public spaces in urban communities, rural settings and everything in between.

  • Michigan has more than 11,000 inland lakes
  • 3,000 miles of freshwater shoreline – more than any other state in the nation
  • You’re never more than an hour’s drive from a state park or recreation area
  • The DNR maintains 15 Great Lakes Harbors of Refuge and 750 public launch sites
  • More than 1,300 public boat launching sites
  • 145 state forest campgrounds offer 3,000 rustic campsites


Traverse City Cherry Festival

Be sure to check out the final two days of the Traverse City Cherry Festival!

The National Cherry Festival in Traverse City is July 1 -8. The week-long festival offers more than 150 events, most of which are free. For more information and details about the event, visit http://www.cherryfestival.org

Since 1910, cherry growers in the Grand Traverse area have come together to celebrate the blossom time of cherries. In 1925, this gathering expanded and became known as the “Blessing of the Blossoms Festival,” complete with a cherry queen, cherry pies and more. Today, the National Cherry Festival has become a week-long celebration bringing local agriculture to one of Michigan’s most beautiful beach towns.

 


Republican Party is born in Jackson, Michigan (1854)

On July 6, 1854, a state convention of anti-slavery men was held in Jackson to found a new political party. "Uncle Tom's Cabin" had been published two years earlier, causing increased resentment against slavery, and the Kansas-Nebraska Act of May, 1854, threatened to make slave states out of previously free territories.

Since the convention day was hot and the huge crowd could not be accommodated in the hall, the meeting adjourned to an oak grove on "Morgan's Forty" on the outskirts of town. Here a state-wide slate of candidates were selected and the Republican Party was born. Winning an overwhelming victory in the elections of 1854, the Republican party went on to dominate national parties throughout the nineteenth century.


National Ice Cream Month

It's National Ice Cream Month!

In 1984, President Ronald Reagan designated July as National Ice Cream Month and the third Sunday of the month as National Ice Cream Day. He recognized ice cream as a fun and nutritious food that is enjoyed by over 90 percent of the nation's population. In the proclamation, President Reagan called for all people of the United States to observe these events with "appropriate ceremonies and activities."

 


Fourth of July

Happy Independence Day!


Battle of Gettysburg, Day 3

On July 3, Lee ordered an attack by fewer than 15,000 troops on the enemy’s center at Cemetery Ridge. The assault, known as “Pickett’s Charge,” managed to pierce the Union lines but eventually failed, at the cost of thousands of rebel casualties, and Lee was forced to withdraw his battered army toward Virginia on July 4.

There are 10 monuments for the 4,000 Michigan soldiers who fought at the Battle of Gettysburg at the Gettysburg National Military Park.


National Blueberry Month

July is National Blueberry Month! Blueberry production and processing has flourished in the global market over the past ten years, almost doubling in the US during that period alone. Michigan has continually ranked in the top 5 states for blueberry production.

  • As of 2016, Michigan ranks #3 nationally in blueberry production at 92 million pounds of blueberries produced (in 2016)
  • Most of Michigan’s blueberry production takes place in Southwest Michigan.
  • There are over 20 blueberry varieties that are commercially grown on a large scale in Michigan.
  • Harvest season in Michigan is June through October

 


UV Safety Month

The need to protect your skin from the sun has become very clear over the years, supported by several studies linking overexposure to the sun with skin cancer. The harmful ultraviolet rays from both the sun and indoor tanning sunlamps can cause many other complications besides skin cancer - such as eye problems and a weakened immune system.

When you are outdoors this summer enjoying all that Pure Michigan has to offer, there are simple steps you can take to safeguard your skin from the harmful effects of UV radiation from the sun.

  • Wear proper clothing
  • Avoid the burn
  • Go for the shade
  • Use extra caution when near reflective surfaces, like water, snow, and sand
  • Apply broad-spectrum sunscreen before going outdoors, and re-apply often throughout the day

 


Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Awareness Week, July 2-8

More than 180 nonindigenous AIS have been introduced to the Great Lakes, many of which are displacing native species, disrupting habitats, and degrading natural, managed and agricultural landscapes. Examples of AIS in Michigan are Asian carp and zebra mussels.

AIS Awareness Week encourages residents to increase their understanding and awareness of AIS and their ecological and economic impacts, and to take preventative measures to help stop the spread and introduction of these species in Michigan. For example, boaters and anglers take steps to avoid accidentally spreading invasive species by washing boats and trailers before leaving the access area and drying boats and equipment for at least five days before launching into a different body of water.

For more information about AID, visit www.michigan.gov/AquaticInvasives


Battle of Gettysburg, Day 2

On July 1, the advancing Confederates clashed with the Union’s Army of the Potomac, commanded by General George G. Meade, at the crossroads town of Gettysburg. The next day (July 2) saw even heavier fighting, as the Confederates attacked the Federals on both left and right.

More than 14,700 Michigan soldiers died in service during the Civil War, roughly one of every six who served.


Margaret Ann Brewer Birthday

Born in Durand, Michigan on July 1, 1930, Margaret A. Brewer became the first female Brigadier General in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1978. She was awarded this promotion after a fulfilling 26 years in the Marines, and she served as a Brigadier General for two years.

During her 28 year career in the Marines, Margaret served as:

· A communications watch officer

· Inspector-Instructor of a Women Marine Reserve unit

· Commanding Officer of the Women Marine companies

· A platoon commander for woman officer candidates

· Commanding officer of the Woman Officer School

· Deputy Director of Women Marines

· The seventh Director of Women Marines

· Director of Public Affairs


Beginning of the Battle of Gettysburg

July 1, 1863 marks the beginning of the Battle of Gettysburg during the American Civil War. The Battle of Gettysburg is considered the most important engagement of the American Civil War. While a defining moment in this nation’s history, it is also a significant moment in Michigan’s history with over 2,600 Michigan men fighting in the battle.


Traverse City Cherry Festival, July 1-8

The National Cherry Festival in Traverse City is July 1 -8. The week-long festival offers more than 150 events, most of which are free. For more information and details about the event, visit http://www.cherryfestival.org

Since 1910, cherry growers in the Grand Traverse area have come together to celebrate the blossom time of cherries. In 1925, this gathering expanded and became known as the “Blessing of the Blossoms Festival,” complete with a cherry queen, cherry pies and more. Today, the National Cherry Festival has become a week-long celebration bringing local agriculture to one of Michigan’s most beautiful beach towns.


Fireworks-Free Fourth of July

The DNR and the Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency have collaborated to offer Fireworks-Free Fourth of July alternative camping options for veterans and other visitors, including pet owners, seeking a quieter holiday July 1-4, 2017. These selected campgrounds are located farther away from traditional community firework displays.

The following parks will host Fireworks-Free Fourth of July, July 1-4:


PTSD Awareness Day

In order to bring greater awareness to the issue of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), the United States Senate designated June 27th as National PTSD Awareness Day. In addition, June has been designated as PTSD Awareness Month by the National Center for PTSD (NCPTSD).

PTSD is a mental health problem that can occur after someone has been exposed to a single traumatic event or multiple traumatic events, such as sexual or physical assault, natural or man-made disaster, and war-related combat stress. Symptoms of PTSD include persistent intrusive thoughts and distressing dreams about the traumatic event, triggered emotional responses to reminders of the trauma, efforts to avoid thinking or talking about the trauma, and persistent hypervigilance for cues that indicate additional danger or trauma re-occurring.

 


Mackinac Bridge is formally dedicated

The bridge opened on November 1, 1957, connecting two peninsulas linked for decades by ferries. A year later (June 25-28, 1958), the bridge was formally dedicated as the "world's longest suspension bridge between anchorages", allowing a superlative comparison to the Golden Gate Bridge, which had a longer center span between towers, and the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge, which had an anchorage in the middle. Today, The Mackinac Bridge is the fifth longest suspension bridge in the world.

 


Legislative Anniversary - PA 197 of 2014

June 24, 2014 – PA 197, a breast feeding anti-discrimination act, was signed into law.


Michigan Historical Facts - Steamer Illinois passes through Locks at Sault Ste. Marie (1855)

On this day in 1855, passage of the steamer Illinois through the locks at Sault Ste. Marie marks the opening of unobstructed shipping between Lake Superior and Lake Huron. Ships were no longer forced to stop at Sault Ste. Marie and portage their cargoes around the rapids of the St. Mary's River, which drops 12 feet from Lake Superior to Lake Huron. The canal was the result of a long-sought 1852 grant by Congress to Michigan of 750,000 acres of public land. Construction, begun in mid-1853, had progressed despite cost overruns, food shortages, a hostile climate and a cholera epidemic. The mile-long canal and two 350-foot locks arranged in tandem were completed in two years. The Sault Locks provided new impetus to Michigan's fledgling mining industry. Copper mining on the Keweenaw Peninsula began in the early 1840s, and Michigan led the nation in copper production for many years. In 1844, surveyor William A. Burt discovered iron ore deposits near Negaunee. Iron ore mining expanded gradually, but by the late 19th century, Michigan produced more iron ore than any other state. Michigan also produced significant amounts of salt, gypsum, oil and natural gas.

Today, between seven and ten thousand ships come through the locks during the shipping season each year.


Michigan Historical Facts - Joe Louis knocks out Max Schmeling

On this day in 1938, Heavyweight champion Joe Louis knocked out Nazi hero Max Schmeling in the first rough of their rematch in Yankee Stadium. Louis floored the German champion three times in 2:04 minutes.


Summer Solstice

In the Northern Hemisphere the longest day and shortest night of the year occur on this date, marking the beginning of summer. A solstice, which is Latin for “sun stands still,” occurs when either of the two points on the ecliptic that lie midway between the equinoxes (separated from them by an angular distance of 90°).


Father's Day

On July 19, 1910, the governor of Washington proclaimed the nation’s first “Father’s Day.” However, it was not until 1972, 58 years after President Woodrow Wilson made Mother’s Day official, that the day became a nationwide holiday in the United States under President Nixon.

Happy Father’s Day!


Lewis Cass

Lewis Cass, born October 9, 1782, passed away on this day in 1866, or 151 years ago. Lewis Cass was an American military officer, politician, and statesman. Cass most notably served as:

· 2nd Territorial Governor of Michigan

· 14th United States Secretary of War

· United States Ambassador to France

· United States Senator for Michigan

· 38th President pro tempore of the Senate

· 22nd United States Secretary of State

 


Ford Motor Company Founded

Headquartered today in Dearborn, Michigan, the Ford Motor Company was founded by Henry Ford on this day in 1903. Ford introduced methods for large-scale manufacturing of cars and large-scale management of an industrial workforce using elaborately engineered manufacturing sequences typified by moving assembly lines; by 1914 these methods were known around the world as Fordism. Between 1903 and 1908 Ford produced the Models A, B, C, F, K, N, R, and S, most of which sold in the hundreds or few thousands a year. In 1908 Ford introduced the mass-produced Model T, which would sell in the millions.


MIS/NASCAR Race Weekend - 6/16 - 6/18


Flag Day

The Fourth of July is traditionally celebrated as America's birthday, but the idea of an annual day specifically celebrating the Flag is believed to have first originated in 1885. BJ Cigrand, a schoolteacher, arranged for the pupils in the Fredonia, Wisconsin Public School, District 6, to observe June 14 (the 108th anniversary of the official adoption of The Stars and Stripes) as 'Flag Birthday'. In numerous magazines and newspaper articles and public addresses over the following years, Cigrand continued to enthusiastically advocate the observance of June 14 as 'Flag Birthday', or 'Flag Day'. This practice would eventually catch on and be adopted by school boards across the country by the start of the twentieth century.

Flag Day - the anniversary of the Flag Resolution of 1777 - was officially established by a Proclamation of President Woodrow Wilson on May 30th, 1916. While Flag Day was celebrated in various communities for years after Wilson's proclamation, it was not until August 3rd, 1949, that President Truman signed an Act of Congress designating June 14th of each year as National Flag Day.


Men's Health Week (6/12-6/18/17)

Men’s Health Facts:

  • Among Michigan men, prostate cancer is the most common newly diagnosed cancer
  • Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in Michigan men

The purpose of Men’s Health Week is to heighten the awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys. This week gives health care providers, public policy makers, the media, and individuals an opportunity to encourage men and boys to seek regular medical advice and early treatment for disease and injury.


Legislative Anniversary - PA 259 of 2014

On June 12, 2014, PA 259 was signed into law, establishing a Michigan National Guard Tuition Assistance Grant Act.


20th anniversary of white-tailed deer as the official state mammal

In 1997, the white-tailed deer was designated as the state’s official mammal.


Michigan becomes first state to ratify the 19th amendment - Michigan Historical Facts

On this day in 1919, Michigan became the first state to ratify the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution that gave women the right to vote. Wisconsin and Illinois also ratified the 19th Amendment on this day.


St. Vincent's Hospital opens - Michigan Firsts

The earliest hospital in the city of Detroit to have a continuous existence is St. Mary's, dating from June 9, 1845. It is the earliest in the state of any operating under private management. Four Sisters of Charity, an order founded by St. Vincent de Paul, began this work in an old log building at the southwest corner of Larned and Randolph Streets, which the Sisters of St. Clare had used for a schoolhouse in the previous decade. St. Vincent's Hospital was the original name. Dr. Vlemcke superintended the medical and surgical work during the opening years. Sisters were the nurses, and operating expenses were met by popular subscription


Free Fishing Weekend (6/10 - 6/11/17)

All fishing license fees will be waived for two days. Residents and out-of-state visitors may enjoy fishing on all waters for all species of fish. All other fishing regulations still apply. For Free Fishing Weekend events in your area, check the following website:

http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,4570,7-153-10364_52261_50497-353755--,00.html


Michigan Firsts - First Legislative Council

On this day in 1824, the first legislative council of Michigan met in Detroit for its first session. While the Michigan Territory was established by an act of Congress in 1805, it was not until 1824 that the Michigan Territory graduated to the second grade of territorial status following the transfer of power from the Governor and a handful of judges to the people. The people elected 18 individuals to the legislative council, of which nine were approved by the President.


National Dairy Month

National Dairy Month started out as National Milk Month in 1937 as a way to promote drinking milk. It was initially created to stabilize the dairy demand when production was at a surplus, but has now developed into an annual tradition that celebrates the contributions the dairy industry has made to the world After the National Dairy Council stepped in to promote the cause.

 

National Dairy Month is a great way to start the summer with nutrient-rich dairy foods. From calcium to potassium, dairy products like milk contain nine essential nutrients which may help to better manage your weight, reduce your risk for high blood pressure, osteoporosis and certain cancers. Whether it's protein to help build and repair the muscle tissue of active bodies or vitamin A to help maintain healthy skin, dairy products are a natural nutrient powerhouse.

 

Michigan Dairy Facts

Michigan’s dairy industry provides nutritious foods produced and processed locally, while making a significant economic impact on communities across the state. Here are some fun facts about one of our state’s largest agricultural industries:

· Michigan’s dairy industry provides jobs, employing local veterinarians, equipment dealers and farm employees. One dollar spent locally generates twice as much income for the local economy.

· Michigan has nearly 1,800 dairy farm families who care for over 425,000 cows.

· The average dairy herd in Michigan has 217 cows. Just like businesses grow to support more families, herd sizes increase to allow the next generation to continue farming.

· 97% of Michigan dairy farms are family owned, many by multiple generations of the same family.

· Michigan is tied for 6th place in milk production in the U.S. In 2016, dairy cows in Michigan produced nearly 11 billion pounds of milk.

· The average Michigan cow produces more than cows in any other state, approximately 26,280 pounds of milk each year. That’s 3,056 gallons of milk!

· Milk in Michigan is local! Michigan’s nearly 1,800 dairy farms produce more than enough milk to supply the entire state. Surplus milk is exported to help meet demand in other states.

· In supermarkets and local farmers markets, you can find milk, cheese and yogurt produced by Michigan dairy farmers. When you buy Michigan dairy products, you not only “buy local” and support area farmers… you buy quality.

· Only 1.7 % of the U.S. population produces food for all of us, plus millions worldwide.


D-Day

On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline to fight Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, France. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower called the operation a crusade in which, “we will accept nothing less than full victory.” More than 5,000 Ships and 13,000 aircraft supported the D-Day invasion and, by day’s end, the Allies gained a foot-hold in Continental Europe as a result of their efforts. The cost in lives on D-Day was high as more than 9,000 Allied Soldiers were killed or wounded, but their sacrifice allowed more than 100,000 Soldiers to begin the slow, hard slog across Europe, to defeat Adolf Hitler’s troops.


Chrysler Corporation incorporated

Founded by Walter Chrysler out of what remained of the Maxwell Motor Company, the Chrysler Corporation was founded on this day in 1925. When Chrysler began production they brought to the table several engineering innovations – including a carburetor air filter, high compression engine, full pressure lubrication, and an oil filter – that was not yet seen in other vehicles. This innovative track record has helped keep them afloat or nearly 100 years and is why Chrysler is known today as one of the “Big Three” alongside General Motors and Ford. Today, Chrysler is headquartered in Auburn Hills, MI and owned by holding company Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA).


National SAFE Day

Gun safety is a key issue for all communities in Michigan, and beyond. With our right to gun ownership comes a duty to responsibly gun ownership practices. SAFE Day holds the power to prevent tragedy from repeating itself. One in every three households in the United States has a gun stored somewhere inside. The Brooklynn Mae Mohler Foundation is committed to ending senseless child deaths through education of responsible gun ownership, and empowering parents to ask about guns where their children visit.


National Cancer Survivor's Day

National Cancer Survivors Day is an annual celebration of life that is held in hundreds of communities nationwide, and around the world, on the first Sunday in June. It is a celebration for those who have survived, an inspiration for those recently diagnosed, a gathering of support for families, and an outreach to the community.


National Egg Day

Michigan’s family-owned egg farmers raise enough eggs each year to supply each Michigander with 23 dozen eggs. Michigan eggs can be found at local diners, large restaurant chains, grocery chains and food services companies. Michigan eggs are produced by laying hens in eight farms across the state who are cared for at all times. The total economic value to the Michigan economy is $625 million.


Fishing and Boating Week (June 3-11, 2017)

National Fishing and Boating Week highlights the importance of recreational boating and fishing. Boating and fishing are fun, stress-relieving activities that you can enjoy with your family and friends anytime, and Michigan is one of the best places in the country for fishing and boating.

Here are just a few reasons why you should get out on the water:

  • Connect with your Family: Family fishing is a great way for family members of all ages to connect and have fun.
  • Connect with Nature: 90% of Americans live within an hour of navigable water. Fishing and Boating are great opportunities to connect more with nature.
  • De-stress: Boating is ranked as one of the top 3 of all stress-relieving activities.
  • Help Conserve: The funds from your fishing licenses and boat registrations go towards the conservation of our natural aquatic areas.


Detroit Grand Prix Race on Belle Isle (June 2-4, 2017)

The Chevrolet Detroit Grand Prix presented by Lear returns to the Motor City June 2-4, 2017. The event will feature the cars of the Verizon IndyCar Series, the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship, the high-flying trucks of the SPEED Energy Stadium SUPER Trucks presented by Traxxas and the Trans Am Series presented by Pirelli. The weekend collectively is referred to as the Chevrolet Detroit Grand Prix presented by Lear and it will feature the Chevrolet Dual in Detroit IndyCar doubleheader.


Great Outdoors Month

This June, celebrate the natural wonder and outdoor spirit of America by getting outside during Great Outdoors Month. What started as Great Outdoors Week under President Clinton in 1998 has grown significantly into a month-long celebration of the outdoors and all the benefits it brings - including annual economic impact of $650 billion nationwide.


PTSD Awareness Month

In order to bring greater awareness to the issue of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), June has been designated as PTSD Awareness Month by the National Center for PTSD (NCPTSD).

PTSD is a mental health problem that can occur after someone has been exposed to a single traumatic event or multiple traumatic events, such as sexual or physical assault, natural or man-made disaster, and war-related combat stress. Symptoms of PTSD include persistent intrusive thoughts and distressing dreams about the traumatic event, triggered emotional responses to reminders of the trauma, efforts to avoid thinking or talking about the trauma, and persistent hypervigilance for cues that indicate additional danger or trauma re-occurring.


CPR & AED Awareness Week

During the week of June 1-7 each year, CPR/AED classes and demonstrations are conducted, events are hosted and educational information is distributed on the importance of being trained in CPR and AED use.

Senate Republicans understand the importance of CPR and AED use. PA 388 of 2016, sponsored by Sen. Tonya Schuitmaker, requires schools to include instruction in CPR and AED in their health education curriculum to all students in grades 7 to 12 effective in the 2017-2018 school year.


Summer Reading Clubs

Summer reading programs at public libraries encourage children, youth and families to read during summer break to help maintain reading skills. To support and encourage summer reading, the Library of Michigan is a member of the Collaborative Summer Library Program, a consortium of states working together to provide high-quality summer reading program materials for children, teens, and young adults at the lowest cost possible for their public libraries.


Memorial Day

Memorial Day is for remembering the people who died while serving in the country's armed forces. This day of remembrance was originally known as Decoration Day which began after the American Civil War in 1868 when the Grand Army of the Republic, an organization of Union veterans founded in Decatur, Illinois, established it as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. By the 20th century, competing Union and Confederate holiday traditions, celebrated on different days, had merged, and Memorial Day eventually extended to honor all Americans who died while in the military service. It typically marks the start of the summer vacation season, while Labor Day marks its end.


First women Michigan State Troopers

Kay E. Whitfield of Pontiac and Noreen E. Hillary of Grand Rapids became the first two women sworn in as officers in the Michigan State Police on this day in 1967.


Anniversary of PA 162

Public Act 162 of 2006 was signed into which made human trafficking a state crime. The author of this law was then Representative, and now Senator, Phil Pavlov.


Emergency Medical Services Week (EMS)

EMS Week is an annual celebration and recognition of EMS providers. EMS agencies – paid or volunteer, public or private – are always available to the communities they serve. EMS as an organization, entity or profession has made a 24/7 commitment to the citizens and visitors in their response area. Readiness for any type of patient, simultaneous single patient incidents or mass casualty incidents is at the core of our existence.


Armed Forces Day

Armed Forces Day is celebrated on the third Saturday in May. Thanks to President Harry S. Truman, it’s a day to pay special tribute to the men and women of the Armed Forces. President Truman led the effort to establish a holiday in order for citizens to unite and to honor our military heroes for their patriotic service in support of the United States of America.

The first official Armed Forces Day took place on May 20, 1950 and was themed “Teamed for Defense.” In honor of the special day, B-36 Bombers flew over state capitals, a march was led by more than 10,000 veterans and troops in Washington, D.C., and over 33,000 people participated in a New York City parade.


Safe Boating Week

From family friendly events at marinas to vessel safety checks, this week is packed with life-saving messages about responsible boating. For more information about safe boating week, visit http://www.safeboatingcampaign.com/

For more information about boater safety and resources specific to Michigan, visit http://www.michigan.gov/dnr


Anniversary of the first Tulip Time

Tulip Time Festival is an annual festival held in Holland, Michigan. Tulip festivals are held in many cities around the United States of America that were founded or largely inhabited by Dutch settlers. It has been held every year in mid-May since 1929 and is currently the largest tulip festival in the United States. The festival currently runs from the first Saturday in May through the second Saturday.

Activities at the celebration include three parades, fireworks, a Dutch Market, various shows and concerts, a craft fair, klompen dancing, and street scrubbing. The city of Holland has thousands of tulips lining the streets and in special tulip gardens throughout the city. It has been ranked previously as Reader’s Digest’s best small town festival.


#517 Day

#517 Day


National Police Week

During National Police Week, #MISenate Republicans honor those that have paid the ultimate sacrifice.

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy signed a proclamation which designated May 15 as Peace Officers Memorial Day and the week in which that date falls as Police Week. Currently, tens of thousands of law enforcement officers from around the world converge on Washington, DC to participate in a number of planned events which honor those that have paid the ultimate sacrifice. Today, National Police Week draws in between 25,000 to 40,000 attendees at Senate Park and the attendees come from departments throughout the United States as well as from agencies throughout the world.

Today, in the United States, more than 900,000 law enforcement officers put their lives on the line for the safety and protection of others. They serve with valor and distinction – and with great success. Federal statistics show that violent and property crime rates in the United States are at historic lows, thanks in large measure to the dedicated service of the men and women of law enforcement. That protection comes at a price, however. Each year, there are approximately 60,000 assaults on law enforcement officers, resulting in nearly 16,000 injuries. Sadly, over the last decade, an average of 146 officers a year have been killed in the line of duty. And throughout U.S. history, more than 20,000 law enforcement officers have made the ultimate sacrifice.


PA 195 was signed into law

Public Act 195 of 1996 was signed into law on this day 21 years ago which provides a tuition waiver for the surviving spouse and children of slain police officers and firefighters.


Mother's Day

Happy Mother’s Day!


Michigan Agriculture College opens in East Lansing

On this day in 1857, the nation’s first state land grant college for farmers, Michigan Agricultural College, opened its doors in East Lansing. The school name was eventually changed to Michigan State College and then finally to Michigan State University. When Michigan Agricultural College opened there were a total of three buildings, five faculty members, 63 students and one college president.

Today, Michigan State University has 545 buildings (including 103 with academic or instructional space), More than 200 programs, 12,100 faculty members, over 50,000 students, and over 540,000 living alumni.


Military Spouse Appreciation Day

In 1984 President Ronald Reagan recognized the profound importance of spousal commitment to the readiness and well-being of military members with Proclamation 5184, dated April 17, 1984. Congress officially made Military Spouse Appreciation Day part of National Military Appreciation Month in 1999. Subsequently the Department of Defense standardized the date by declaring the Friday before Mother’s Day every year as Military Spouse Appreciation Day to show appreciation for the sacrifices of military spouses.

On Military Spouse Appreciation Day, we celebrate military spouses contributions to keeping our country safe. America’s military spouses are the backbone of the families who support our troops during mission, deployment, reintegration and reset. They are the silent heroes who are essential to the strength of the nation and they serve our country just like their loved ones.


Margaret Ann Brewer

Born in Durand, Michigan in 1930, Margaret A. Brewer became the first female Brigadier General in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1978. She was awarded this promotion after a fulfilling 26 years in the Marines, and she served as a Brigadier General for two years.

During her 28 year career in the Marines, Margaret served as:

  • A communications watch officer
  • Inspector-Instructor of a Women Marine Reserve unit
  • Commanding Officer of the Women Marine companies
  • A platoon commander for woman officer candidates
  • Commanding officer of the Woman Officer School
  • Deputy Director of Women Marines
  • The seventh Director of Women Marines
  • Director of Public Affairs


May is Michigan Wine Month

May is Michigan Wine Month! There are over 200 wineries in Michigan. Look for activities all month long as wineries and wine trails prepare to welcome you to their tasting rooms. Enjoy everything that Pure Michigan wine country has to offer!

For more information and to plan your Michigan winery tour, visit www.michiganwines.com/wine-search


Travel and Tourism Week (5/7 - 5/13/17)

  • A total of 326,685 jobs, with income of $10.6 billion, were sustained by the traveler economy in Michigan last year.
  • Traveler-supported employment represents 6.2% of all employment in the state of Michigan.

Visit http://www.michigan.org/ to plan your Pure Michigan summer vacation!


National Foster Care Month

May is National Foster Care Month, a month set aside to acknowledge foster parents, family members, volunteers, mentors, policymakers, child welfare professionals, and other members of the community who help the nearly 400,000 children and youth in foster care find permanent homes and connections.

In 1972, the Children's Bureau sponsored—and President Nixon proclaimed—National Action for Foster Children Week to raise awareness of the needs of children in foster care and recruit more foster parents. The following year, Children published "The Bill of Rights for Foster Children."

In 1988, President Reagan issued the first presidential proclamation that established May as National Foster Care Month.


Tulip Time Festival (5/6 - 5/14/17)

For a full list of events and details, visit http://www.tuliptime.com/


National Day of Prayer

The National Day of Prayer is an annual observance held on the first Thursday of May, inviting people of all faiths to pray for the nation. It was created in 1952 by a joint resolution of the United States Congress, and signed into law by President Harry S. Truman. Our Task Force is a privately funded organization whose purpose is to encourage participation on the National Day of Prayer. It exists to communicate with every individual the need for personal repentance and prayer, to create appropriate materials, and to mobilize the Christian community to intercede for America’s leaders and its families. The Task Force represents a Judeo-Christian expression of the national observance, based on our understanding that this country was birthed in prayer and in reverence for the God of the Bible.


Older Americans Month

May is a month of fresh beginnings where Perennials bloom once again, blazing a trail of bright color. May is also when we celebrate Older American’s Month (OAM), acknowledging the perennial contributions of older adults to our nation.

When Older Americans Month was established in 1963, only 17 million living Americans had reached their 65th birthday. About a third of older Americans lived in poverty and there were few programs to meet their needs. Interest in older Americans and their concerns was growing. A meeting in April 1963 between President John F. Kennedy and members of the National Council of Senior Citizens led to designating May as “Senior Citizens Month,” the prelude to “Older Americans Month.”

Historically, Older Americans Month has been a time to acknowledge the contributions of past and current older persons to our country, in particular those who defended our country. Every President since Kennedy has issued a formal proclamation during or before the month of May asking that the entire nation pay tribute in some way to older persons in their communities. Older Americans Month is celebrated across the country through ceremonies, events, fairs, and other such activities.


Budget Highlights

Today the #MISenate passed a FY 2018 budget recommendation that invests in Michigan's future, guarantees public safety, increases services for senior citizens, continues our investment in transportation and boosts post-high school education funding.


ALS Awareness Month

ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), also commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a neurodegenerative disease. This fatal disease affects the nerve cells (motor neurons) that control a person’s muscles. As the disease causes these motor neurons to deteriorate, the brain loses the ability to start and control voluntary muscle movement. This is why people with ALS often lose the ability to speak. The disease slowly paralyzes its victims eventually taking away the ability to breathe.

At any given time, approximately 30,000 Americans are living with ALS. The disease is most often diagnosed between the ages of 40 and 70. Although ALS is approximately twice as likely to strike military veterans, the disease equally impacts men and women across all ethnic backgrounds. Some cases of ALS (10 percent) are caused by a gene mutation. In these instances, ALS is likely to affect more than one family member. However, for most (90 percent), no familial pattern is apparent.


Stroke Awareness Month

National Stroke Awareness Month began in May 1989 after President George H. W. Bush signed Presidential Proclamation 5975. National Stroke Awareness Month aims to increase the public awareness about the warning signs of stroke, symptoms of a stroke, stroke prevention, and the impact of stroke on survivors, families and caregivers. The United States Government, along with National Stroke Association, the American Heart Association, and other non-profits, work together to educate the American people about the prevention of stroke and provide key resources to stroke survivors.

Facts:

  • Stroke is the 5th leading cause of death in the U.S.
  • More than 133,000 Americans die annually from strokes.
  • Up to 80 percent of strokes are preventable.
  • Someone suffers from a stroke every 40 seconds and there are nearly 7 million stroke survivors in the U.S.
  • High blood pressure is the most common cause of a stroke and 3 out of 4 people who suffer their first strokes have high blood pressure.
  • Family history of stroke increases your chance for stroke.
  • Stroke recovery is a lifelong process.
  • Temporary stroke symptoms are called transient ischemic attacks (TIA). They are warning signs prior to actual stroke and need to be taken seriously.

At any sign of stroke call 9-1-1- immediately.


Mental Health Month

May is Mental Health Month. Michigan takes mental illness seriously. Our system of mental health courts ensures that defendants dealing with mental illness receive access to health professionals and treatment programs they need. And the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) provides many resources for those looking for local mental health services. It's important to build on our understanding of mental illness and to ensure those who are struggling that they are not alone.

For more information from MDHHS: http://www.michigan.gov/mdhhs/0,5885,7-339-71550_2941_4868_4899---,00.html

Mental Health Awareness Month also comes to the United States via the Mental Health America organization. This year’s theme for Mental Health Month is “Life with a Mental Illness” and will call on individuals to share what life with a mental illness feels like for them in words, pictures and videos.

Mental disorders are common in the United States and internationally. An estimated 26.2 percent of Americans ages 18 and older, or about one in four adults, suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year. Even though mental disorders are widespread in the population, the main burden of illness is concentrated in a much smaller proportion about 6 percent, or 1 in 17 who suffer from a serious mental illness. In addition, mental disorders are the leading cause of disability in the U.S. and Canada for ages 15-44. Many people suffer from more than one mental disorder at a given time. Nearly half (45 percent) of those with any mental disorder meet criteria for two or more disorders, with severity strongly related to comorbidity.


Military Appreciation Month

Congress designated May as National Military Appreciation Month in 1999 to ensure the nation was given the opportunity to publically demonstrate their appreciation for the sacrifices and successes made by our service members - past and present. Each year the president makes a proclamation, reminding Americans of the important role the U.S. Armed Forces have played in the history and development of our country.


Silver Star Service Banner Day

Every May 1 Americans honor the sacrifices of the combat wounded, ill and dying service members on Silver Star Service Banner Day. Across all branches of The United States military, Silver Star families are honored for their services with the symbol of the Silver Star Service Banner and Flag. We are encouraged on May 1 to take the opportunity to do the same.


Small Business Week (4/30/17 - 5/6/17)

Every year since 1963, the President of the United States has issued a proclamation announcing National Small Business Week, which recognizes the critical contributions of America’s entrepreneurs and small business owners.

More than half of Americans either own or work for a small business, and they create about two out of every three new jobs in the U.S. each year.

In Michigan specifically, small businesses greatly impact our economy as they employ roughly 51.7 percent of the private-sector labor force. Small businesses are crucial to the fiscal condition of the state and numbered 851,112 in 2010.


Charter School Week (5/1/17 - 5/5/17)

Every year, National Charter Schools Week gives us the chance to raise awareness about the successes and accomplishments of charter schools. Recently, the Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) at Stanford University conducted a national study of charter schools, covering 95% of students attending charter schools across the 27 states that issue them, and found the following:

  • The study showed strong positive results in both math and reading for many subgroups, including Black students, students living in poverty, English Learners (EL), and students receiving special education services.
  • Students in charter public schools outperformed their district-run public school peers in reading and performed as well as students in district-run public schools in math.

While not the first state to issue charter schools, Michigan was the first state to allow universities to authorize charter schools which is now a widely used model across the United States.


Teacher Appreciation Week (5/1/17 - 5/5/17)

Since 1984, National Path To Education (PTA) has designated the first week in May as a special time to honor the men and women who lend their passion and skills to educating our children. Teachers are real life superheroes who educate, innovate, encourage and support the foundation of our country’s future – its children.


Arbor Day

Arbor Day (or Arbour; from the Latin arbor, meaning tree) is a holiday in which individuals and groups are encouraged to plant and care for trees. Today, many countries observe such a holiday. Though usually observed in the spring, the date varies, depending on climate and suitable planting season.


Michigan Historical Facts - Apple Blossom name state flower

The Apple Blossom was named the Michigan state flower in 1897. The choice is fitting given the state’s long ties to the fruit. Michigan ranks third in the country in apple production, just behind Washington and New York. While Michigan’s orchards produce many varieties of apples, lawmakers singled out the flower of the pyrus coronaria, or crabapple, for the distinction of becoming the Michigan state flower.

Peak Bloom is from April to May.

Fun Fact: The largest apple ever picked from a tree came from Caro, Michigan. It weighed three pounds, two ounces.


Chrysler builds their first M-3 tank (1941)

Right from the start of production, two versions of the M3 were built; The U.S. Army version, known as the General Lee and the British version, known as the General Grant. Initially, the M3 was built at a rate of 14 /day, with 8 being allocated to the U.S. Army, and the remaining six being allocated to the British. The M3 Medium Tank was powered by a 9 cylinder Wright Continental R975 giving the tank a top speed of 21 mph with a range of 120 miles. Initially the M3 had a riveted hull, which was upgraded first to a cast hull, then to an all welded hull. The engine was also later upgraded to a 370hp Chrysler Multi-bank engine. The M3 Medium Tank was only ever meant to be a stop-gap tank until the introduction of the M4 Sherman. It did, however see extensive service, especially in the Western Desert, where it played a very significant role. It first saw action in May 1942 in the Gazala Line area.

The M3 helped redress the balance in tank capabilities, where previously the British had been so hard pressed to match the German tanks. The M3 proved to be the equal of the PzKpfw III and only slightly inferior to the PzKpfw IV tank.

 


National Volunteer Week

Organized by the Point of Light foundation, National Volunteer Week is about inspiring, recognizing and encouraging people to seek out imaginative ways to engage in their communities. It’s about demonstrating to the nation that by working together, we have the fortitude to meet our challenges and accomplish our goals. National Volunteer Week in the United States was first established via Presidential Proclamation 4288, signed by President Richard Nixon in 1974.


Earth Day

Earth Day is an annual event, celebrated on April 22, on which events worldwide are held to demonstrate support for environmental protection. It was first celebrated in 1970 and is now coordinated globally by the Earth Day Network. Presently, Earth Day is celebrated in more than 192 countries each year with corporations and activists alike promoting new projects, initiatives and campaigns to protect and restore the Earth. The initiative taken by the Earth Day Network has helped inspire millions to live eco-friendly lives.


Severe Weather Awareness Week (4/16-4/22)

Each year, the Michigan Committee for Severe Weather Awareness sponsors Severe Weather Awareness Week to highlight the need to be prepared in the event of severe weather.


Easter

Happy Easter


National Park Week (4/15 - 4/23)

Home to five national parks and over one hundred state parks, Michigan takes great pride in preserving and showcasing its natural landscapes and habitats to over 20 million visitors each year.  As a result of Michigan’s efforts, visitor spending in Michigan hit $22.8 billion last year, and the state’s Pure Michigan tourism campaign generated $6.87 for each dollar spent on Pure Michigan advertising in 2014.


Distracted Driving Awareness Month

Thousands have died in car crashes involving cell phone use. New technology allows us to make phone calls, read or send texts or emails, and update social media while driving – all actions that are proven to increase crash risk. The National Safety Council observes April as Distracted Driving Awareness Month to draw attention to this epidemic. NSC wants empower you to put safety first and Take Back Your Drive.

This is not to say, however, that the use of cell phones while driving is the only form of distracted driving. Distracted driving includes any activity that could divert a person’s attention away from the primary task of driving but, because text messaging requires visual, manual, and cognitive attention from the driver, it is by far the most dangerous and alarming distraction.


National Library Week featuring Michigan's eLibrary

First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country each April. It is a time to celebrate the contributions of our nation’s libraries, librarians, and to promote library use and support.


Red Wings win first Stanley Cup (1936)

On April 11, 1936, the Detroit Red Wings defeated Toronto to win their first Stanley Cup. The Red Wings beat Toronto 3-2 to win the series in four games. This was Detroit’s second appearance in the Final and Toronto’s sixth.


MI repeals prohibition with ratification of 21st Amendment

On April 10, 1933, Michigan became the first state to ratify the 21st Amendment, which repealed the prohibition of alcohol. It was the only constitutional amendment in history which Congress specified had to be ratified by state conventions rather than by state legislatures.

In the words of Michigan’s then Gov. William Comstock: “Prohibition didn’t prohibit.”


Passover

Passover is an important, biblically derived Jewish festival. The Jewish people celebrate Passover as a commemoration of their liberation by God from slavery in Egypt and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of Moses. It commemorates the story of the Exodus as described in the Hebrew Bible especially in the Book of Exodus, in which the Israelites were freed from slavery in Egypt. According to standard biblical chronology, this event would have taken place at about 1300 BCE (AM 2450).


National Library Week

First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country each April. It is a time to celebrate the contributions of our nation’s libraries, librarians, and to promote library use and support.


Robin becomes official state bird

Michigan designated "robin redbreast" (American robin) as the official state bird in 1931 after an election held by the Michigan Audubon Society. The legislation, which was adopted by House Concurrent Resolution No. 30 rather than an act of the Michigan Legislature and therefore not documented in the statutory law of the Michigan Compiled Laws, noted that "the robin redbreast is the best known and best loved of all the birds in the state of Michigan." The American robin (Turdus migratorius) is also the state bird of Connecticut and Wisconsin.

Facts:

  • Robins were named by early settlers after the familiar robin red-breast of Europe; a bird with similar markings that is not closely related to the American Robin.
  • The American robin has a place in Native American mythology. The story of how the robin got its red breast by fanning the dying flames of a campfire to save a Native American man and a boy is similar to those that surround the European robin.
  • The robin is considered a symbol of spring.


Distracted Driving Awareness Month

Thousands have died in car crashes involving cell phone use. New technology allows us to make phone calls, read or send texts or emails, and update social media while driving – all actions that are proven to increase crash risk. The National Safety Council observes April as Distracted Driving Awareness Month to draw attention to this epidemic.

This is not to say, however, that the use of cell phones while driving is the only form of distracted driving. Distracted driving includes any activity that could divert a person’s attention away from the primary task of driving but, because text messaging requires visual, manual, and cognitive attention from the driver, it is by far the most dangerous and alarming distraction.


Opening Day

The Tigers home opener will take place at 1:10 p.m. vs. the Red Sox.


Work Zone Awareness Week (April 3 - 7)

Each year in the spring, National Work Zone Awareness Week (NWZAW) is held to bring national attention to motorist and worker safety and mobility issues in work zones. Since 1999, FHWA has worked with the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) and the American Traffic Safety Services Association (ATSSA) to coordinate and sponsor the event. Over the years, other transportation partners have joined the effort to support NWZAW. In addition to a National event conducted each year, many States host their own NWZAW events.

Visit the Michigan Department of Transportation’s website for the 2017 state construction map, or click here:

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdot/MDOT_C_MapWeb-2011_350547_7.pdf


National Donate Life Month

National Donate Life Month (NDLM) was instituted by Donate Life America and its partnering organizations in 2003. Celebrated in April each year, NDLM features an entire month of local, regional and national activities to help encourage Americans to register as organ, eye and tissue donors and to celebrate those that have saved lives through the gift of donation.

Currently, nearly 124,000 men, women and children are awaiting organ transplants in the United States.


Month of the Military Child

April is Month of the Military Child. This special celebration is a legacy of former Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger – established to underscore the important role children play in the Armed Forces community and to recognize and applaud families and their children for the daily sacrifices they make.

#MISenate Republicans took action in 2005 to make sure that military children aren't left behind. In 2005, the Children of Veterans Tuition Grant (CVTG) was established under Public Act 248 to provide an undergraduate tuition program for children of certain deceased or disabled members of the armed forces of the United States. The program is designed to provide undergraduate tuition assistance to certain children older than 16 and less than 26 years of age who are the natural or adopted child of a Michigan veteran.


Autism Awareness Month

Nearly a quarter century ago, the Autism Society launched a nationwide effort to promote autism awareness, inclusion and self-determination for all, and assure that each person with ASD is provided the opportunity to achieve the highest possible quality of life.

Facts & Statistics

  • About 1 percent of the world population has autism spectrum disorder.
  • Prevalence in the United States is estimated at 1 in 68 births.
  • More than 3.5 million Americans live with an autism spectrum disorder.
  • Prevalence of autism in U.S. children increased by 119.4 percent from 2000 (1 in 150) to 2010 (1 in 68). (CDC, 2014) Autism is the fastest-growing developmental disability.
  • Prevalence has increased by 6-15 percent each year from 2002 to 2010.
  • Autism services cost U.S. citizens $236-262 billion annually.
  • Cost of lifelong care can be reduced by 2/3 with early diagnosis and intervention.

 


Tax Supported Schools

Tax Supported Schools


Child Abuse Prevention Month

April was first declared Child Abuse Prevention Month by presidential proclamation in 1983. Since then, April has been a time to acknowledge the importance of families and communities working together to prevent child abuse.

A resource guide on how to help prevent child abuse can be found here:

https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/preventing/preventionmonth/resource-guide/?hasBeenRedirected=1

April 2 – April 8 is also Blue Ribbon Week, a time to celebrate our children and present a unified, positive and visible commitment towards keeping children safe. For more information on Blue Ribbon Week and ways you can help, visit: http://www.facesofchildabuse.org/blue-ribbon-week.html


Financial Literacy Month

National Financial Literacy Month is recognized every April in an effort to highlight the importance of financial literacy and teach Americans how to establish and maintain healthy financial habits. More specifically, it refers to the set of skills and knowledge that allows an individual to make informed and effective decisions with all of their financial resources. In 2000, The National endowment for Financial Education introduced Youth Financial Literacy Day and by 2004 the United States Senate designated April as Financial Literacy Month as we know it today.

Since 2006, the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC) has emerged as the leading organization promoting Financial Literacy Month, releasing an annual survey on financial education.

 


March 29, 2017 is Rosie the Riveter Day in Michigan

March 29, 2017 is Rosie the Riveter Day in Michigan

Proclamation from Gov. Snyder reads:

March 29, 2017: Rosie the Riveter Day

WHEREAS, Rosie the Riveter is an icon representing the can do attitude of women as they joined the work force during World War II and helped the United States and its allies win the war; and,

WHEREAS, these women helped build the B-24 Liberator bombers at the Willow Run Bomber Plant, home to the original Rosie, Rose Will Monroe; and,

WHEREAS, these women traveled from their homes to do whatever job was needed in order to assist the war effort, including riveting, welding, flying planes, keeping victory gardens, recycling materials needed for the war effort, all while continuing to care for their families at home; and,

WHEREAS, the legacy of the women of the Greatest Generation is recognized as critical to preserve. Future generations will benefit greatly from the lessons that can be learned from these fine dedicated women;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Rick Snyder, governor of Michigan do hereby proclaim March 29, 2017 as Rosie the Riveter Day in Michigan.

 


National Medal of Honor Day

National Medal of Honor day is a day that is dedicated to all Medal of Honor recipients. It was on March 25, 1863 when the first Medals of Honor were presented.  Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton presented Medals of Honor (Army) to six members of  “Andrews Raiders” for their volunteering and participation during an American Civil War raid in April of 1862. Created in 1861, the Medal of Honor is the United States of America’s highest military honor.  It is awarded only to US military personnel, by the President of the United States in the name of Congress, for personal acts of valor above and beyond the call of duty. There are three versions of the Medal of Honor; one for the Army, one for the Navy and one for the Air Force, with personnel of the Marine Corps and the Coast Guard receiving the Navy version. Since its creation, there have been 3,468 Medals of Honor awarded to the country’s soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and coast guardsmen.


Good luck to Michigan in the Sweet 16

 Good luck to Michigan in the Sweet 16!


National Agriculture Day

National Agriculture Day is a day to recognize and celebrate the abundance provided by agriculture. Every year, producers, agricultural associations, corporations, universities, government agencies and countless others across America join together to recognize the contributions of agriculture. The Agriculture Council of America and the National Ag Day program was started in 1973.


First day of Spring

Celebrated around the world, the Vernal equinox (or autumnal equinox in the Southern Hemisphere) marks the first day of spring! Modern astronomy aside, people have recognized the vernal equinox for thousands of years. There is no shortage of rituals and traditions surrounding the coming of spring. Many early peoples celebrated for the basic reason that their food supplies would soon be restored. The date is significant in Christianity because Easter always falls on the first Sunday after the first full moon after the vernal equinox.


Comprehensive School Plan

On March 20, 1837, Gov. Mason signed a comprehensive school plan for Michigan with free public schools.

Following statehood on January 26, 1837, the Primary School Law, Act 63 of 1837, was passed by the Legislature. Following territorial law precedent, this law, effective April 1, 1838, provided for district school boards elected by eligible voters who paid school taxes. The origin of today’s seven member school boards was an 1849 amendment that allowed these three-member boards to be expanded by four members. These school boards had a number of duties that included the levying of school taxes, the purchasing or leasing of a schoolhouse, paying teachers, and filling vacancies on the school board. Also provided for was a board of inspectors which set the school district boundaries and was required to visit schools at least twice per year to inspect and advise teachers and students. This board would also examine prospective teachers to judge their fitness, both moral and intellectual, to teach.


Poison Prevention Week

On September 26, 1961, the 87th United States Congress passed a joint resolution (Public Law 87-319) requesting that the President of the United States proclaim the third week of March National Poison Prevention Week. On February 7, 1962, President John F. Kennedy responded to this request and proclaimed the third week of March as National Poison Prevention Week. The first National Poison Prevention Week was therefore observed in March 1962 and has been recognized ever since.

The following daily themes will be promoted in 2017:

  • Monday, March 20 – Children Act Fast … So Do Poisons
  • Tuesday, March 21 – Poison Centers: Saving You Time and Money
  • Wednesday, March 22 – Poisonings Span a Lifetime
  • Thursday, March 23 – Home Safe Home
  • Friday, March 24 – Medicine Safety

For more information and resources, visit:

https://www.poisonhelp.hrsa.gov/what-can-you-do/national-poison-prevention-week/index.html


St. Patrick's Day

Celebrated every March 17th, St. Patrick’s Day is a cultural and religious celebration in honor of Saint Patrick (AD 385-461), the foremost patron saint of Ireland. St Patrick's Day, while not a legal holiday in the United States, is nonetheless widely recognized and observed throughout the country as a celebration of Irish and Irish American culture. Celebrations include prominent displays of the color green, eating and drinking Irish-inspired food, religious observances, and numerous parades. The holiday has been celebrated on the North American continent since the late eighteenth century.

While not actually Irish himself, Saint Patrick is credited with converting Ireland to Christianity in the AD 400s.


MSU basketball

Good luck to the Michigan State Spartans as they take on the University of Miami Hurricane’s in tonight’s game! #MSU #GoGreen #Spartans


Michigan Basketball

Good luck to the University of Michigan Wolverines as they take on Oklahoma State in today’s game!  #GOBLUE #Wolverines


313/Detroit Day

Today is Detroit Day! Celebrate and share what you love about Detroit on this day.


Michigan FFA 89th Annual Convention

The Michigan FFA – which aims to make a difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth, and career success through agriculture education – is holding their 89th annual convention at Michigan State University in the Wharton Center.

For more information, please visit: http://www.michiganffa.com/association/conferences/convention_program2017.pdf

 


PA 1 of 2011

PA 1 of 2011 was sponsored by Senator Hune and signed into law on March, 8, 2011.

The law codified the Michigan Agricultural Environmental Assurance Program into state law which incentivized farmers to adopt sound environmental practices. Since the law was passed, the number of new farms verified has doubled.

 


Women of Aviation Worldwide Week (3/6 - 3/12)

Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week is a global outreach initiative that takes place annually during the week of March 8, anniversary date of the world’s first female pilot license since 1910 and International Women’s Day since 1914. The week is designed to raise awareness of aviation opportunities available to girls of all ages while celebrating the accomplishments of past and present women of aviation.


Ag & Natural Resources Week at MSU (3/4 - 3/11)

The health and stability of Michigan’s economy is dependent on the agriculture sector. Much of Michigan’s economy is based on industries that have strong adverse reactions to economic downturns. Due to the fact that food is a necessity, the food and agriculture system is more resistant. As the pioneer land-grant university, Michigan State University plays a vital role in agricultural health and research for the state of Michigan.

Agriculture and Natural Resources Week (ANR Week) continues to be one of the largest events of its kind in the nation. Foundations for the week were laid by the Farmers’ Institute more than a century ago. In 1898, Michigan Agricultural College hosted the first statewide Farmers’ Institute “Round-Up.” Agriculture Hall was completed in 1909, and a fourth floor auditorium provided the meeting place. Five years later, the round-up combined with farm association meetings to become the first Farmers Week. In 1982, Farmers Week was renamed Farmers’ Week and Natural Resources Days followed in 1985 by a name change to Agriculture and Natural Resources Week, better known today as ANR Week. With more than 50 programs and annual association meetings, ANR Week has developed into a late winter gathering of minds deeply concerned and involved in the today’s world of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

Topics of interest have changed with the industry over the past century to coincide with trends and technology from machine based farming equipment to chemical and biological advances, and commodity specialization. Themes have also changed to reflect the times; during the 1960s the space age was topical, the 1970s featured science and cybernetics, and the 1980s bought forth issues related to world hunger.


Consumer Protection Week (3/5 - 3/11)

The health and stability of Michigan’s economy is dependent on the agriculture sector. Much of Michigan’s economy is based on industries that have strong adverse reactions to economic downturns. Due to the fact that food is a necessity, the food and agriculture system is more resistant. As the pioneer land-grant university, Michigan State University plays a vital role in agricultural health and research for the state of Michigan.

Agriculture and Natural Resources Week (ANR Week) continues to be one of the largest events of its kind in the nation. Foundations for the week were laid by the Farmers’ Institute more than a century ago. In 1898, Michigan Agricultural College hosted the first statewide Farmers’ Institute “Round-Up.” Agriculture Hall was completed in 1909, and a fourth floor auditorium provided the meeting place. Five years later, the round-up combined with farm association meetings to become the first Farmers Week. In 1982, Farmers Week was renamed Farmers’ Week and Natural Resources Days followed in 1985 by a name change to Agriculture and Natural Resources Week, better known today as ANR Week. With more than 50 programs and annual association meetings, ANR Week has developed into a late winter gathering of minds deeply concerned and involved in the today’s world of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

Topics of interest have changed with the industry over the past century to coincide with trends and technology from machine based farming equipment to chemical and biological advances, and commodity specialization. Themes have also changed to reflect the times; during the 1960s the space age was topical, the 1970s featured science and cybernetics, and the 1980s bought forth issues related to world hunger.


Congress creates second national park - Mackinac Island

Mackinac National Park, created in 1875 in response to the growing popularity of the island as a summer resort following the civil war, was the second national park of the United States and created so as to give tourists a chance to vacation on the island despite the U.S. military presence and use of the island.

In 1895 the fort was decommissioned and, at the request of the Michigan Governor John T. Rich, the park and fort was turned over to the state of Michigan, becoming Mackinac Island State Park, the first state park in Michigan.


National Anthem Day

Written by Francis Scott Key, the Star Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States of America. On National Anthem Day, we celebrate and honor this song.


March is Reading Month

March is celebrated as National Reading Month as a time to encourage children of all ages to pick up a book and read.

Each year at the beginning of March, school children kick off National Reading Month by celebrating the birthday of Dr. Seuss! Teachers will design contests, family literacy events, and even pajama and pillow days to provide cozy mornings of uninterrupted reading.

Reading is vital to a successful education and lays the foundation to a rewarding future. Learning to read at a young age has been shown to increase a student’s ability to remember facts, comprehend information and be successful in both school and his or her career.


Red Cross Month

Now over 150 years old, the Red Cross movement was first conceptualized by Jean Henri Dunant in 1859 after having witnessed The Battle of Solferino in which some 40,000 soldiers were killed or wounded in a single day. In a book he published in 1862 that recounted his observations, titled “A Memory of Solferino,” Dunant suggested creating “permanent societies of volunteers who in time of war would give help to the wounded without regard to their nationality.” The vision for the Red Cross, championed by Gustave Moynier of the Geneva Public Welfare Society, became a reality the following year.

It would not be for another 18 years, however, until the American Red Cross chapter would be founded by Clara Barton in 1881. Regarded as “The Angel of the Battlefield” during the American Civil War for locating and nursing over 1,000 missing soldiers, Barton became the first president of the American Red Cross serving for over two decades.

Today, the Red Cross is a nationwide network consisting of more than 650 chapters, 36 blood services, 500,000 volunteers, and 30,000 employees who annually mobilize relief to people affected by disasters across the globe.


First Telegraph Sent - Michigan Firsts

The telegraph, invented by Samuel Morse in 1844, was a communication breakthrough that allowed news to spread almost instantaneously.

Four years following the invention of the telegraph, Detroit sent its first message to Buffalo, NY and by 1860 most large cities in the Lower Peninsula had telegraph service.


JFK creates the Peace Corp

Originally proposed in 1960 in a 2 a.m. impromptu presidential campaign speech, then presidential hopeful John F. Kennedy challenged 5,000 students at the University of Michigan to contribute two years of their lives to help people in countries of the developing world.

Created in 1961 by executive order 10924 issued by President John Kennedy, the Peace Corps is a volunteer program run by the United States government that is responsible for providing technical assistance to developing countries, helping people outside the United States understand American culture, and helping Americans to understand the cultures of other counties.

Since that speech, nearly 220,000 Americans have joined the Peace Corps and served in over 140 counties.

 


Women's History Month

Women’s History Month had its origins as a national celebration in 1981 when Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28 which authorized and requested the President to proclaim the week beginning March 7, 1982 as “Women’s History Week."  Throughout the next five years, Congress continued to pass joint resolutions designating a week in March as "Women’s History Week." 

In 1987 after being petitioned by the National Women’s History Project, Congress passed Pub. L. 100-9 which designated the month of March 1987 as “Women’s History Month."  Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month.  Since 1995, Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama have issued a series of annual proclamations designating the month of March as “Women’s History Month.”  

Lansing is home to the Michigan Women’s Historical Center and the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame.

The Michigan Women’s Historical Center is the only museum in Michigan dedicated to women’s history.

The Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame was established in 1983 and honors the achievements of remarkable Michigan women.


Fat Tuesday

The Tuesday before Ash Wednesday/the start of Lent. Many people celebrate Fat Tuesday with a Paczski, a Michigan tradition


Rare Disease Day

Feb. 28 marks the tenth international Rare Disease Day coordinated by EURORDIS. On and around this day hundreds of patient organizations from countries and regions all over the world will hold awareness-raising activities based on the theme of research.  Rare Disease Day 2017 is therefore an opportunity to call upon researchers, universities, students, companies, policy makers and clinicians to do more research and to make them aware of the importance of research for the rare disease community.


George Washington's Birthday

George Washington was born on this day in 1732 in Westmoreland County, Virginia.


National Ski Association was organized in Ishpeming

In 1904 a meeting was held in Ishpeming, Michigan to discuss formation of a national ski association, but it wasn't until 1905 that the National Ski Association officially formed. Ishpeming Ski Club President Carl Tellefsen proposed holding a meeting after the 1905 jumping meet to found a ski association which, among other duties, would oversee jumping tournaments. In 1905, the association was formally organized during a meeting attended by officers from the Ishpeming, Minneapolis, Red Wing, Minnesota, Stillwater, Minnesota and Eau Claire, Wisconsin ski clubs. On February 21, 1905, Carl Tellefsen announced the formation of the National Ski Association with himself was its first president.

In 1962, the 57-year-old National Ski Association renamed itself the U.S. Ski Association (USSA), and moved its offices to Colorado Springs, Colorado. In 1976 the USSA and the U.S. Ski Team agreed to part ways. The USSA continued to control the rules and governance of the sport, as well as organizing travel programs for recreational skiers, while the U.S. Ski Team focused solely on the elite national team.

In 1988 the USSA and U.S. Ski Team merged again under the direction of Thomas Weisel, who proposed the creation of a 15-person ‘super board’ responsible for governing both organizations. Howard Peterson, who was the CEO of the USSA at the time, was put in charge of the new organization as CEO and the USSA subsequently moved its national offices from Colorado Springs to its current location in Park City, Utah.

 


National Entrepreneurship Week

This annual celebration is designed to expand the visibility of National Entrepreneurship Week in the United States. The mission is to institutionalize it as a celebration of American entrepreneurs and to prepare the new business leaders of the future. The Week is in response to the U S House of Representatives Resolution #699, supporting an annual National Entrepreneurship Week and encouraging the celebration of it annually at the local, state, and national levels.

In Michigan, entrepreneurship encourages job creation and is a vital part of Michigan’s reinvention and continued growth. More Michigan startups have received venture backing than ever before. In 2015, 74 companies received $282 million from Michigan venture capital firms, representing a 48% increase in the last five years.


Presidents' Day

Presidents’ Day is an American holiday celebrated on the third Monday in February. Originally established in 1885 in recognition of President George Washington, it is still officially called “Washington’s Birthday” by the federal government. Traditionally celebrated on February 22—Washington’s actual day of birth—the holiday became popularly known as Presidents’ Day after it was moved as part of 1971’s Uniform Monday Holiday Act, an attempt to create more three-day weekends for the nation’s workers. While several states still have individual holidays honoring the birthdays of Washington, Abraham Lincoln and other figures, Presidents’ Day is now popularly viewed as a day to celebrate all U.S. presidents past and present.


John Glenn Orbits the Earth

On Feb. 20, 1962, John Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth.


Free Fishing Weekend

This weekend event has been celebrated in Michigan every year since 1994. It provides a great way to showcase the state’s unique freshwater fishing opportunities and introduce anglers to a special winter experience. All fishing license fees are waived for the two days. Anglers can enjoy fishing on both inland and Great Lakes waters for all species of fish. All fishing regulations will still apply.


National Organ Donor Day

While there have been advances in medical technology and donation, the demand for an organ and tissue donation still vastly exceeds the number of donors. As of today, a total of 121,722 people are waiting for an organ and roughly 22 people will die each day waiting for an organ. Here are some additional facts about organ donations:

  • 1 organ donor can save up to 8 lives.
  • A national computer system and strict standards are in place to ensure ethical and fair distribution of organs. Organs are matched by blood and tissue typing, organ size, medical urgency, waiting time and geographic location.
  • People of all ages and medical histories should consider themselves potential donors. Your medical condition at the time of death will determine what organs and tissue can be donated.
  • Organs and tissues that can be donated include: heart, kidneys, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, corneas, skin, tendons, bone, and heart valves.
  • Organ donation is consistent with the beliefs of most major religions.
  • An open-casket funeral is possible for organ and tissue donors.
  • There is no cost to the donor’s family or estate for organ and tissue donation.
  • If you are sick or injured and admitted to the hospital, the number one priority is to save your life. Organ donation can only be considered after brain death has been declared by a physician.
  • Information about an organ donor is only released to the recipient if the family of the donor requests or agrees to it. Otherwise, a patient’s privacy is maintained for both donor families and recipients.
  • When a patient is “added to the list,” a transplant hospital adds a patient’s medical information into UNOS’ computer system. The patient is not immediately placed on a ranked list. When a deceased organ donor is identified, UNOS’ computer system generates a ranked list of transplant candidates who are suitable to receive each organ. Factors affecting ranking may include blood type, tissue type, medical urgency, waiting time, expected benefit, geography and other criteria.

 


Career and Technical Education Month

In Michigan, Career and Technical education is designed as part of Michigan’s career preparation system to provide learners with experiences, knowledge, and skills that will prepare them to choose and obtain employment upon high school completion. CTE is a way of closing the skills gap, expanding economic opportunities and improving student outcomes.

Michigan is one of the leading states in apprenticeships, with a 14% increase in registered apprentices over the previous year and more than 13,700 active apprentices.

CTE Month is a public awareness campaign ACTE holds each February to celebrate Career and Technical Education and the achievements and accomplishments of CTE programs across the country. CTE Month 2017, with its tagline of "Celebrate Today, Own Tomorrow!" gives you the chance to inform others of the innovation and excellence that exists within your local CTE programs and raise awareness of the crucial role that CTE plays in readying our students for careers and our nation for economic success.


Rosa Parks Day

In 1997, the Michigan Legislature commemorated the significant role Mrs. Rosa L. Parks has played in the history of the state of Michigan and the nation when the Legislature declared that the first Monday following February 4 of each year shall be known as “Mrs. Rosa L. Parks day” through the passing of PA 28 of 1997.


Ronald Reagan's Birthday

Ronald Regan was born on this day in 1911 in Tampico, Illinois.

While best known for redefining the purpose of government, pressuring the Soviet Union to end the Cold War, and solidifying the conservative agenda for decades to come as the 40th President of the United States, Ronald Reagan was also a fulfilled college athlete at Eureka College, a Hollywood Actor, and the Governor of California.


Michigan College Goal

MI College Goal began in Michigan in 2004 in cooperation with the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) and the Lumina Foundation for Education. Since its inception, thousands of students in Michigan have received help in completing their FAFSA financial aid form on time.


Super Bowl

NFL Super Bowl LI takes place on this day on 6:30 PM on FOX. The Game will take place at NRG Stadium in Houston, TX.


Michigan Central Railroad

On this day in 1838, passengers rode the Michigan Central Railroad for the first time from Detroit to Ypsilanti.

The Michigan Central Railroad was originally incorporated to establish a rail service between Detroit and St. Joseph. Going on to operate in Michigan, Indiana, and Illinois, the Michigan Central Railroad went on to be controlled by the New York Central Railroad, which later became Penn Central and the Conrail, and the to Norfolk Southern who currently owns much of the former Michigan Central trackage.


American Heart Month

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women. While Americans of all backgrounds can be at risk for heart disease, African American men, especially those who live in the southeast region of the United States, are at the highest risk for heart disease. Additionally, more than 40 percent of African Americans have high blood pressure, a leading cause of heart disease and stroke. That's why this February during American Heart Month, Million Hearts is encouraging African American men to take charge of their health and start one new, heart-healthy behavior that can help reduce their risk of heart disease and stroke.


Go Red for Women Day

National Wear Red Day is a day in February when many people wear red to show their support for the awareness of heart disease.

Why Go Red? Heart disease and stroke cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year, killing approximately one woman every 80 seconds. Fortunately, we can change that because 80 percent of cardiac and stroke events may be prevented with education and action. That’s why this year we are asking that you wear red on National Wear Red Day and Donate to Go Red For Woman. By doing so you help support educational programs to increase women’s awareness and critical research to discover scientific knowledge about cardiovascular health.


Anniversary of PA 167

Today marks the one year anniversary of PA 167 of 2015, Michigan’s Blue Alert Act. The Michigan Blue Alert Act is an act to prescribe the blue alert system of Michigan as the official response to reports of serious injury or death of a law enforcement officer in certain circumstances; and to provide for the powers and duties of certain state and local governmental officers and entities.


National Freedom Day

National Freedom Day is a United States observance on February 1 honoring the signing by Abraham Lincoln of a joint House and Senate resolution that later became the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. President Lincoln signed the Amendment outlawing slavery on February 1, 1865, although it was not ratified by the states until later.


SR 8 designates February 1 as Blue Star Mother's Day

Senate Resolution 8 designates February 1 as Blue Star Mother's Day in Michigan


Black History Month

February is Black History Month! As Gerald Ford said in 1976 when the U.S. government first recognized Black History Month, use this time to "seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history."


Happy 180th Birthday to the state of Michigan!

What is now Michigan was first settled by various Native American tribes before being colonized by French explorers in the 17th century and becoming a part of New France. After the defeat of France in the French and Indian War in 1762, the region came under British rule. The territory was finally ceded to the newly independent United States after the British defeat in the American Revolutionary War. Eventually, in 1805, the Michigan Territory was formed which lasted until it was admitted into the Union on January 26, 1837, as the 26th state following the Toledo Strip negotiations. The state of Michigan soon became an important center of industry and trade in the Great Lakes region and a popular immigrant destination.


Snowmobile Safety Awareness Week

Snowmobiling is a fun and exciting family activity enjoyed by over 4 million people across the United States and Canada.

  • The Economic Impact of Snowmobiling:
    • United States—$26 billion annually
    • Canada—$8 billion annually
  • Over 100,000 full time jobs are generated by the snowmobile industry in North America. Those jobs are involved in manufacturing, dealerships and tourism related businesses.
  • In Michigan, you must complete the Michigan Snowmobile Ed Course if you are between the ages of 12 to 16 and will be riding in Michigan.
  • Last winter in Michigan, there were 15 confirmed snowmobile related deaths.


Snowmobile Safety Awareness Week

Snowmobiling is a fun and exciting family activity enjoyed by over 4 million people across the United States and Canada.

  • The Economic Impact of Snowmobiling:
    • United States-$26 billion annually
    • Canada-$8 billion annually
  • Over 100,000 full time jobs are generated by the snowmobile industry in North America. Those jobs are involved in manufacturing, dealerships and tourism related businesses.
  • In Michigan, you must complete the Michigan Snowmobile Ed Course if you are between the ages of 12 to 16 and will be riding in Michigan.
  • Last winter in Michigan, there were 15 confirmed snowmobile related deaths.


Sanctity of Human Life Sunday

Created by Ronald Reagan through a presidential proclamation on January 16th, 1984, National Sanctity of Human Life Day was designated to be celebrated on January 22, 1984. This day was selected in particular because it marked the 11th anniversary of Roe v. Wade.

Regan issued the proclamation annually thereafter, designation Sanctity of Human Life Day to be the third Sunday in January. George H. W. Bush, his successor, continued the annual proclamation throughout his presidency as did his son, George W. Bush, throughout his tenure as President.


Inauguration Day

Inauguration day is an important day for all Americans as the ceremonies demonstrate the resilience of our republic with the peaceful transfer of power from President Barack Obama to President Donald Trump. Congratulations and best of luck to our new President!


Detroit incorporated as Michigan's first city

On January 18, 1802, the Legislature of the Northwest Territory granted Detroit township status, effective Feb. 1 of that year. The new Town of Detroit was finally an incorporated municipality, able to elect its own board of trustees and write its own laws.  


State of the State 2017

@MISenate will be tweeting live #MISOTS17


Michigan's 2017 State of the State Infographic


MLK Day

An American Baptist minister, activist, humanitarian, and leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement, Martin Luther King Jr. was an extraordinary individual who had a way of inspiring through his practice of nonviolence. Known for his involvement with movements such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1955, the Albany Movement in 1961, the Birmingham campaign in 1963, and perhaps most famously, his March on Washington in 1963 where he delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech, Martin Luther King jr. set forth a precedent of nonviolent protest for human rights in the United States.

Background Information of MLK Day:

  • April 8, 1968 - Rep. John Conyers (D-MI) introduces legislation for a federal holiday to commemorate King, just four days after his assassination.
  • April 1971 - The Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) presents to Congress petitions containing three million signatures in support of the holiday. Congress does not act.
  • 1973 - Illinois is the first state to adopt Martin Luther King Jr. Day as a state holiday.
  • November 1979 - The House fails to pass Conyers' King Holiday bill by five votes.
  • 1982 - Coretta Scott King and Stevie Wonder bring the speaker of the House, Tip O'Neil, petitions with over six million signatures in favor of a holiday.
  • 1983 - Congress passes and President Ronald Reagan signs legislation creating Martin Luther King, Jr. Day as a national holiday. Senators Jesse Helms (R-NC) and Gordon Humphrey (R-NH) attempt to block the bill's passing.


Ratification Day

Ratification Day in the United States refers to the anniversary of the ratification of the Treaty of Paris on January 14, 1784.

Signed at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, the treaty officially ended the American Revolutionary War.

 


First Assembly Line

Ford’s use of the assembly line, the most significant piece of Ford’s efficiency crusade, was a turning point in modern production methods. Inspired by the production methods used by flour mills, the assembly line cut the time of production for a car from twelve hours to two and a half which equates to an increase in production by 480 percent. Ford was able to not only make his vehicles more quickly through this method but at a higher quality as each worker specialized in the assembly of one part as opposed to being a jack-of-all-trades. This revolutionary production method allowed Ford to push a more competitive product at a cheaper cost and price which made Ford Motor Company a giant.


Michigan Firsts: Joan L. Wolfe

On this day in 1977, Joan L. Wolfe became the first woman to chair a major commission.

Wolfe, born in 1929, was an extraordinary Michigan woman who became one of the most impactful environmentalists in our state’s history. Alongside her accomplishment of becoming the first woman to chair a major state commission, Joan Wolfe also founded the West Michigan Environmental Action Council in 1968, became a member of the first Natural Resources Trust Fund Board, was a part of the Governor’s Advisory Committee on Electric Energy Alternatives, and played a major role in the passage of the landmark Michigan Environmental Protection Act of 1970.

In 1996, she was one of the eight honorees of the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame.


National Cut Your Energy Costs Day

Today is National Cut Your Energy Costs Day! Here are some tips for saving money on energy this winter.

National Cut Your Energy Costs Day encourages people to look for ways to reduce energy costs, and save on their energy bills.

It is often in the little things that you do that can save you big money on your energy bill, such as:

  • Weatherproof your home
  • Replace old windows with new energy-efficient windows
  • Replace old furnace with new energy-efficient furnace
  • Properly maintain furnace
  • Use solar heat if possible
  • Turn down thermostats
  • Turning off lights when leaving a room
  • Use energy-efficient compact fluorescent light bulbs
  • Run dishwasher and washing machine only when fully loaded
  • Lower water heater temperature
  • Take shorter showers
  • Unplug unused appliances
  • Carpool whenever possible
The above listed are just a few of the many ways to conserve energy. Using these tips, along with the others ones you may already have in practice, as well as all new energy saving tips that you can find online, you will be able to move forward better each day saving money for you home and family.


First Day of Session

It's the first day of the 99th Legislative Session! The #MISenate returns at noon today! #MILeg


Human Trafficking and Slavery Awareness Day

With nearly two dozen related pieces of legislation passed in 2014 alone, the Michigan Legislature has been adamantly fighting Human Trafficking in an effort to make Michigan safer for its residents. In addition to these new laws, Governor Snyder also assembled a special team this March, led by Cpl. Erin Diamond from Wayne County, to combat human trafficking in Michigan.

  • Today, there are more slaves in the world than at any other point in human history with an estimated total of 20 to 30 million slaves.
  • Of those millions of individuals, it is estimated that anywhere from 600 to 800 thousand people are trafficked across international borders every year.
  • 80% of the slaves today are female and nearly half are believed to be children. The average victim is between the ages of twelve and fourteen years old.


Henry Ford's World Speed Record

On January 12, 1904 in New Baltimore, Michigan, Henry Ford personally drove the rechristened 999 with his mechanic Ed "Spider" Huff at the throttle. A new land speed record was achieved of 91.37 mph (147.05 km/h) on an ice track carved into Lake St. Clair's Anchor Bay. It stood for only a few weeks, but this was ample time to bring more good publicity for Ford's new company.


National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day

Today we salute our law enforcement! We greatly appreciate their hard work to keep our communities safe!

On Jan. 9, 2017, partnering organizations in support of law enforcement officers nationwide will promote National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day (L.E.A.D.). In light of recent negativity directed toward law enforcement nationally, there is a need to show law enforcement officers that our citizens recognize the difficult and sometimes impossible career they have chosen, in public service to us all.

Here are a few ways you can show your support on Jan. 9:

• Change your profile picture on social media to the .jpg image provided at www.facebook.com/nationalcops.
• Wear blue clothing in support of law enforcement.
• Send a card of support to your local police department or state agency.
• Share a story about a positive law enforcement experience on social media.
• Ask children in your community to write letters in support of law enforcement.
• Participate in Project Blue Light - Proudly display your blue light in support of law enforcement.
• Organize an event or a rally in support of your law enforcement officers.
• Advertise your support through local media outlets/billboards.
• Post the public service announcement supplied by C.O.P.S. to your organization's webpage or social media pages.

Most importantly, if you see a police officer, thank a police officer.


North American International Auto Show

The North American International Auto Show kicks off today! Be sure to check it out before it ends on January 22!


Winter Tourism in Michigan

Michigan is a Winter Wonderland! There is no shortage of things to do in our great state throughout the Winter!


National Mentoring Month

Research shows that quality mentoring relationships have a positive impact on young people in a variety of personal, academic, and professional situation.

Mentoring connects a young person to personal growth and development and social and economic opportunity. Being a mentor is one of the most important things you can do for a child. One hour a week can make a big difference in a young person's life.

National Mentoring Month is a campaign held each January to promote youth mentoring in the United States. It was inaugurated in 2002, and is spearheaded by the Harvard School of Public Health, MENTOR, and the Corporation for National and Community Service. Participants in the National Mentoring Month campaign include leading nonprofit organizations and numerous governors and mayors. Designated nonprofit and governmental agencies are responsible for coordinating local campaign activities in communities across the country, including media outreach and volunteer recruitment.


Radon Action Month

Did you know that radon is the number two cause of lung cancer in the United States? What makes radon so deadly is that it cannot be seen, smelled, or tasted. The only way to be aware of its presence is through proper testing. Most radon related problems can be fixed by a do-it-yourselfer for less than $500! Make sure to test your home once every 2 to 5 years. The Environmental Protection Agency instituted National Radon Action Month to help people become more aware of the facts about radon and the dangers it presents to their families' health.


National Blood Donor Month

This January, the American Red Cross celebrates National Blood Donor Month and recognizes the lifesaving contribution blood and platelet donors make to modern healthcare.


National Human Trafficking and Slavery Prevention Month

January is Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. #MISenate Republicans recently passed several bills -- now law -- that will provide assistance to survivors by giving them access to additional resources to help support their recovery. The new laws also increase penalties for those who commit crimes of coercing victims to engage in commercial sexual activity, creating heightened protections for survivors of human trafficking.

Human Trafficking is a modern-day form of slavery, widespread throughout the United State and occurs right here in Michigan. In fact, Michigan's proximity to the Canadian border and waterways increase the likelihood of trafficking in our state.

While we would like to think of slavery as a relic of the past, we know that it is not. Today, millions of women, men, and children around the world are subjected to forced labor, domestic servitude, or the sex trade at the hands of human traffickers. What many do not know is that this crime occurs right here in the United States, in our own cities and towns. By Presidential proclamation, January is National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month.


School Board Recognition Month

Did you know that January is School Board Recognition Month? We want to thank our local leaders for their dedication and willingness to serve as advocates for our children and schools. This is your opportunity to build community awareness and understanding about the crucial role an elected board of trustees assumes in a representative democracy.


Western Michigan University in the Cotton Bowl

Did you know that January is School Board Recognition Month? We want to thank our local leaders for their dedication and willingness to serve as advocates for our children and schools. This is your opportunity to build community awareness and understanding about the crucial role an elected board of trustees assumes in a representative democracy.


State Capitol Building Dedicated on Jan. 1, 1879

On January 1, 1879, a magnificent new Capitol was dedicated to the people of Michigan. Speaking at its dedication, Governor Croswell noted that the structure stood as "evidence of the lasting taste, spirit and enterprise" of the citizens of the state. In November 1992, more than 113 years later, another celebration took place, marking both the successful conclusion of the Capitol's restoration and its rededication to at least another 100 years of service to Michigan.


Happy New Year 2017

Click here for infographics from previous years.